Solution for bad lag on some planets


#1

The servers are fine (because I personally play on the EU servers while many others have issues), but many people still have issues. Especially people outside of EU accessing EU servers/planets. Empirically it’s possible to construct a route from the US to EU with low latency, but ISPs tend to choose the cheap route in some cases and people are having issues because of it.

What I propose are game server tunnels that use low-latency routes established by Wonderstruck or amazon or whoever. These tunnels would allow people with detected unplayable connections to connect instead to their local server, and use the low latency tunnel to communicate with the EU server. Thus instead of relying on their ISP’s questionable route to a different continent, they would only have the latency of connecting to their local server plus the established tunnel.

The down-side of this is that it would triple the bandwidth cost (download to first server, upload from first server, download to EU server) for people with bad ISPs, but the up-side is that everyone can play with each-other more consistently. Obviously something like this would also take effort to implement.

I’m certain this would improve the problem because I’ve heard people have had success with EU VPNs, which is effectively the same thing as what I’m suggesting.

The problem is that the best planets for some resources are on servers in different regions. Also selecting hunting planets becomes difficult because we have so few high tier ones. Not everyone can connect to every region well. An alternative solution would be to add a bunch more planets for every region so people don’t have to play on other region servers, but I’m not sure if that’s an option or not…

@james @lucadeltodecso What do you guys think about this? Do you guys have any strategies on how to improve the routes between the players and the EU servers during US peak time?


No Bypass Available to avoid EU and AUS
#2

I thought about suggesting something like this, a US hop that we connect to instead of letting fate alone determine our path to Europe.

More planets is also fine and probably cheaper.


#3

What they would need is a proxy server, limited to game traffic, that runs country local (even on AWS). You’d only need a micro (but honestly they could just cluster it across the existing USA instances).

AWS doesn’t charge by bandwidth, so no additional cost and latency should be comparable. Probably an extra 5ms in reality but users wouldn’t notice that.


#4

If this is true then I really hope the devs consider this.


#5

They do charge for data between data centers (availability zones), but it is at a reduced rate (you’re using their fat pipes). See the “data transfer” section of https://aws.amazon.com/ec2/pricing/on-demand/


Setting up a proxy like this might be a great help! Frustrating that it’s not being routed naturally, though


#6

yeah, so it sounds amazon has thought of this pattern and has functionality to support it.

If you support this change, set your avatar to a fat pipe!

image


#7

Hard to choose; hot pants or fat pipes.


#8

well which do you want the devs to work on first?


#9

Whynotboth.gif


#10


#11

Good point. But they are paying for egress traffic out of EU already, so should be net neutral no?


#12

This makes sense to me. Have regional gateways that all game traffic routes through. Servers can still be regional too, but the gateways ensure everyone gets a consistent experience. Not sure about costs though, would not be in favor of this if it meant everyone had to pay a subscription.


#13

It would add a bit on top. They would be paying for egress from the US gateway (at standard egress rates), and data transfer from US to EU. I think it caps out at about 20% more per GB (at the 150TB/month rate)


#14

True. It looks like 2 cents per gigabyte from Frankfurt to US east.

I should measure my traffic during an average play session! Maybe I’m nerding out too much at that point! hah!


#15

This might be something us players could set up on the cheap too, as an interim solution.

One approach: stand up an OpenVPN server in US East (or whichever US aws region), and configure it to split tunnel only traffic to boundless hosts. I haven’t tried that on windows machines though; not sure how well it handles split tunneling


#16

I’d pay a subscription to be able to connect to all servers 24/7.


#17

Maybe this can be a gleam-club perk?


#18

Some people would be upset though, just because.


#19

Eh, that feels a bit like strong arming a subset of the population (that are already in a crappy situation)


#20

Yeah it would be a positive change but the perception would be negative.